Transition Whatcom

In 2016, Sanders refused corporate donations and relied on small donors to fund his White House campaign. He has proposed a constitutional amendment that would effectively reverse Citizen United ruling and ban corporations and nonprofits from unlimited campaign expenditures. The independent senator would also require any organization to disclose election-related campaign expenditures of $10,000 or more.

Sanders would institute a carbon tax and aim to slash U.S. emissions by 40 percent by the year 2030. He would end all federal subsidies for the gas, oil and coal industries. In addition, he would investigate corporations he sees as “climate deniers” that have spent money raising doubts about climate change. He is a co-sponsor of a resolution calling for a “Green New Deal”.

He would make preschool free for all 4-year-olds, funding the plan by increasing taxes on the wealthy and some Wall Street transactions. In higher education, Sanders’ “College for All Act” would make tuition at four-year public colleges free for most Americans; two-thirds of the program would be paid for with federal funds, and one-third with state funds. Sanders would pay for the federal portion with what he calls a Wall Street speculation fee of 0.5 percent on stock trades.

Sanders would divide large banks — those with assets worth more than 3 percent of the nation’s GDP — into smaller entities and charge a new fee for high-risk investment practices, including credit default swaps. He would also ban financial industry executives from serving on the central bank’s 12 Federal Reserve’s regional boards of directors.

Sen. Sanders has not forgotten about the butchery of Henry Kissinger and the US’s failure to prosecute him for war crimes. He argued that the bloated defense budget was infringing on other national priorities, by eating up money and resources that could be spent at home.

For the $4 trillion spend on the Iraq War, the US could have nearly bought half of Iraq's entire oil reserves outright at going prices.

Sen. Sanders did manage to team up with Senator Mike Lee (R-Utah) to pass a Senate resolution stopping U.S. support for the Saudi war in Yemen. The resolution concerning war powers, passed 56-41, represents the first time ever the Senate has voted to revoke military support from a congressionally unauthorized war. Senators said the 1973 War Powers resolution forbids logistical assistance like this from the U.S. without congressional approval.

The Senate also passed an amendment, introduced by GOP Sen. Todd Young of Indiana, to ensure that mid-air refueling between U.S. and Saudi Air Force, which the U.S. suspended last month, does not resume. There's no chance that lawmakers will stop U.S. support for the Saudis' prosecution of the Yemen war this year because the House will not vote on the measure before the end of the year.

U.S. involvement in the Yemen conflict began in 2015 when the Obama administration offered logistical assistance in Yemen to Saudi Arabia's forces fighting against Houthi rebels, who are aligned with Iran. After more than four years of fighting, the death toll is now in the tens of thousands, with many of the dead being children suffering from debilitating malnourishment, according to human rights groups. Tens of millions more Yemenis are displaced.

Senator Sanders has thus been sharply critical of America's various Cold War atrocities in Latin America, Iran, Southeast Asia, and of Israel's treatment of Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza.

In 2016, Sanders refused corporate donations and relied on small donors to fund his White House campaign. He has proposed a constitutional amendment that would effectively reverse Citizen United ruling and ban corporations and nonprofits from unlimited campaign expenditures. The independent senator would also require any organization to disclose election-related campaign expenditures of $10,000 or more.

Sanders would institute a carbon tax and aim to slash U.S. emissions by 40 percent by the year 2030. He would end all federal subsidies for the gas, oil and coal industries. In addition, he would investigate corporations he sees as “climate deniers” that have spent money raising doubts about climate change. He is a co-sponsor of a resolution calling for a “Green New Deal”.

He would make preschool free for all 4-year-olds, funding the plan by increasing taxes on the wealthy and some Wall Street transactions. In higher education, Sanders’ “College for All Act” would make tuition at four-year public colleges free for most Americans; two-thirds of the program would be paid for with federal funds, and one-third with state funds. Sanders would pay for the federal portion with what he calls a Wall Street speculation fee of 0.5 percent on stock trades.

Sanders would divide large banks — those with assets worth more than 3 percent of the nation’s GDP — into smaller entities and charge a new fee for high-risk investment practices, including credit default swaps. He would also ban financial industry executives from serving on the central bank’s 12 Federal Reserve’s regional boards of directors.

Sen. Sanders has not forgotten about the butchery of Henry Kissinger and the US’s failure to prosecute him for war crimes. He argued that the bloated defense budget was infringing on other national priorities, by eating up money and resources that could be spent at home.

For the $4 trillion spend on the Iraq War, the US could have nearly bought half of Iraq's entire oil reserves outright at going prices.

Sen. Sanders did manage to team up with Senator Mike Lee (R-Utah) to pass a Senate resolution stopping U.S. support for the Saudi war in Yemen. The resolution concerning war powers, passed 56-41, represents the first time ever the Senate has voted to revoke military support from a congressionally unauthorized war. Senators said the 1973 War Powers resolution forbids logistical assistance like this from the U.S. without congressional approval.

The Senate also passed an amendment, introduced by GOP Sen. Todd Young of Indiana, to ensure that mid-air refueling between U.S. and Saudi Air Force, which the U.S. suspended last month, does not resume. There's no chance that lawmakers will stop U.S. support for the Saudis' prosecution of the Yemen war this year because the House will not vote on the measure before the end of the year.

U.S. involvement in the Yemen conflict began in 2015 when the Obama administration offered logistical assistance in Yemen to Saudi Arabia's forces fighting against Houthi rebels, who are aligned with Iran. After more than four years of fighting, the death toll is now in the tens of thousands, with many of the dead being children suffering from debilitating malnourishment, according to human rights groups. Tens of millions more Yemenis are displaced.

Senator Sanders has thus been sharply critical of America's various Cold War atrocities in Latin America, Iran, Southeast Asia, and of Israel's treatment of Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza.

Bernie Repeats CIA Talking Points On Venezuela
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMxuU6_3seg&feature=share&f...

Richard McManus for Snohomish County Sheriff
https://www.facebook.com/groups/244680586441998/

Citizens need to know where public officials and candidates stand on national issues because some go to the very heart of the character and sense of justice.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMxuU6_3seg&feature=share&f...

Richard McManus for Snohomish County Sheriff
https://www.facebook.com/groups/244680586441998/

Citizens need to know where public officials and candidates stand on national issues because some go to the very heart of the character and sense of justice.

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