Transition Whatcom

I would like to open up discussion calling on herbalists, medicinal plant farmers, distillers, medicine makers, wildcrafters, and anyone who has any genuine interest in medicinal plants. As a new member to the Whatcom county community, I am seeking out the herb folk to make connections, network, and share our collective wisdom. Aside from listening and feeling into the plants with my heart, I find the best way to learn about plant medicine is to connect with other people that work with them in a really deep heartfelt and experiential way. 

I am interested in what other people are interested in as far as medicinal plants go. As a teacher, I like to understand what it is people wish to learn about and are interested in so I may offer classes, workshops and teachings that serve the community as a whole. Any recommendations anyone has for me as far as ways to connect with plant people, good teaching venues, and methods of marketing myself and what I offer to the community would be openly embraced!! 

Thank you. I hope this finds you feeling blessed in your heart and in your mind. 

Sajah

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Hi Sajah,

Welcome to Bellingham. I like the spirit with which you open this discussion on the Transition Ning site. In terms of Transition work, I see that knowledge and use of plants as food and medicine to be very important to replace or at least supplement our dependence on the modern medical system. I also see a big need for knowledge about preserving habitat and using sustainable harvest practices for the wild plant allies.

This line in your opening post is what I really resonate with:"Aside from listening and feeling into the plants with my heart, I find the best way to learn about plant medicine is to connect with other people that work with them in a really deep heartfelt and experiential way.

I have a strong interest in plants for their medicine, wisdom and nutrition and solace. I don't have formal training in herbal medicine. I study on my own from the plants themselves and a little from friends, some on line sources and books, and an occasional workshop.

There are some knowledgable local herbal teachers. If you haven't been there already, I suggest you check out Wonderland Tea and Herbs on Railroad Ave. downtown, and there's another herb shop in the Public Market on Cornwall Ave. Also I believe some herb folks set up tables at the Saturday Farmers Market. The Community Food Co-op has a class series that you might be able to offer a class through. Ask for Kevin Murphy at the Co-op, he's in charge of that.

If you don't know this area well I would be open to showing you some places, trails to connect with the wild plants. I've lived here for over 35 years and walked a lot. You can leave a message on my member page at this site.

Angela
Hi Angela, thanks for your response and for your kind words, as well as the advice on where to check things out. Looks like I've been on track with my work here in Bham, as I've looked into all those places except Wonderland, which is up there on my list. I just finished a weekend of teaching at Bloom called the Spirituality of Plant Medicine, which was a series of three classes: Plant Spirit Healing, Shamanic Ethnobotany, and The Chakra Herbal. It was fun, low turnout, but fun. I'll be teaching a fun little class at the Coop at the end of November on Herbal Medicine Gifts... just going through some very simple medicine making ideas revolving around gifts and such.

I would be very interested in any recommendations for trails, hikes etc. especially for picking mushrooms (even though those spots tend to be relatively well guarded by their tenders). Especially anything you know of down around Sedro-Woolley as that's where I'm at (southern tip of lake whatcom).

I hope this finds you well Angela!! Many blessings.
Sajah



Angela MacLeod said:
Hi Sajah,

Welcome to Bellingham. I like the spirit with which you open this discussion on the Transition Ning site. In terms of Transition work, I see that knowledge and use of plants as food and medicine to be very important to replace or at least supplement our dependence on the modern medical system. I also see a big need for knowledge about preserving habitat and using sustainable harvest practices for the wild plant allies.

This line in your opening post is what I really resonate with:"Aside from listening and feeling into the plants with my heart, I find the best way to learn about plant medicine is to connect with other people that work with them in a really deep heartfelt and experiential way.

I have a strong interest in plants for their medicine, wisdom and nutrition and solace. I don't have formal training in herbal medicine. I study on my own from the plants themselves and a little from friends, some on line sources and books, and an occasional workshop.

There are some knowledgable local herbal teachers. If you haven't been there already, I suggest you check out Wonderland Tea and Herbs on Railroad Ave. downtown, and there's another herb shop in the Public Market on Cornwall Ave. Also I believe some herb folks set up tables at the Saturday Farmers Market. The Community Food Co-op has a class series that you might be able to offer a class through. Ask for Kevin Murphy at the Co-op, he's in charge of that.

If you don't know this area well I would be open to showing you some places, trails to connect with the wild plants. I've lived here for over 35 years and walked a lot. You can leave a message on my member page at this site.

Angela
Sajah! Welcome to the lands & waters of Koma Kulshan and thanks for initiating your calling in of the medicine community!
I look forward to meeting you and walking on earth under sky & learning together in community.

You may have heard that a few folks are initiating a tincture medicine making workshop through the vision & initiative of Laura S & Lia. Dates will be shared as that is clarifies.

There are many of us in whatcom that are learning & sharing the green earth ways of healing and caring care for the earth & each other.
This autumn is the time of gathering in fungi, root, and seed medicine and sharing the abundance of the harvest.
This year I'm especially drawn to learning more from the fungi kingdom and will learn to make some adaptive & immune enhancing tinctures & teas.

Thanks also for joining us online at the Earth Gardens: Edible-Medicinal-Wild Habitat group at:
http://transitionwhatcom.ning.com/group/organic

I'll forward your discussion to a few other folks who may have missed reading your first posting.
I'm working on a draft of a plant medicine ethnobotany discussion to add to the Earth Garden group and will post link here once its posted.
yep

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